Translation (C) 2001. Scott Corrales, Institute of Hispanic Ufology.
Special thanks to Santiago Camacho.
DATE: November 21, 2001

In May 2001, the Reuters news agency reported on the sensational discovery of ancient ruins under the waters of the Caribbean.

Oceanoagrepher Paulina Zelitsky can lay claim to the discovery: this former Soviet underwater expert devoted herself to locating secret submarine bases and is currently engaged in civil engineering and topography work in the ocean bed. Exactly a year ago, Zelitsky achieved certain notoriety after having located the remains of the USS Maine, the warship whose sinking unleashed the Spanish-American War in 1898. The vessel was some five kilometers off Havana and at a depth of 1,000 meters. Zelitsky's team made impressive documentaries about the site.

Only a few months ago, Zelitsky's team reportedly found "a great underwater plateau with remains of what appear to be enormous architectural structures of human manufacture, partially covered withsand. From above, the shapes are reminiscent of pyramids, streets and buildings. As can be imagined, this news fired the imagination of believers in Atlantis.

Today we know that aside from sonar traces, a video camera has been lowered to the archaeological site. Unfortunately, the research is being carried out in utmost secrecy, and very little information is being released. In spite of the secrecy, what has been obtained is allegedly of great interest.

It appears that the videotape is being analyzed by the Marine Archaeology and Antrhopology Center of the Cuban Academy of Sciences. The experts' work is centered around the inscriptions found on the stones, which were undoubtedly made by humans. It has been proven that the stones were cut and dressed to fit one another and form larger structures.

Very little is known about the inscriptions, except that they are numerous and are found practically throughout the underwater site. Symbols and drawings of unknown significance have also been found.

Hieronimus & Co., Inc., P.O. Box 648, Owings Mills, MD 21117 USA
Voice Mail: (410) 356-4852 Fax: (410) 356-6229